W orld AIDS Day is held on the 1st December each year and is an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, show their support for people living with HIV and to commemorate people who have died. World AIDS Day was the first ever global health day, held for the first time in 1988.

Why is World AIDS Day important?

Over 100,000 people are living with HIV in the UK. Globally there are an estimated 34 million people who have the virus. Despite the virus only being identified in 1984, more than 35 million people have died of HIV or AIDS, making it one of the most destructive pandemics in history.red-ribbon2

Today, scientific advances have been made in HIV treatment, there are laws to protect people living with HIV and we understand so much more about the condition. Despite this, each year in the UK around 6,000 people are diagnosed with HIV, people do not know the facts about how to protect themselves and others, and stigma and discrimination remain a reality for many people living with the condition.

World AIDS Day is important because it reminds the public and Government that HIV has not gone away – there is still a vital need to raise money, increase awareness, fight prejudice and improve education.

What should I do on World AIDS Day?

World AIDS Day is an opportunity to show support to and solidarity with the millions of people living with HIV. Wearing a red ribbon is one simple way to do this.

World AIDS Day is also a great opportunity to raise money for NAT (National AIDS Trust) and show your support for people living with HIV. If you feel inspired to hold an event, such as a bake sale, or simply sell red ribbons.

But what about after World AIDS Day?

Although World AIDS Day is a great opportunity to talk about HIV, it is important to keep the momentum going all year round. Sign up to NAT’s newsletter which will keep you up to date with all the new developments in HIV and the work of the National AIDS Trust, or visit our website, HIVaware, for more information.

To find out how you can raise money, see what events are happening on World AIDS Day or to sign up for the newsletter, visit www.worldaidsday.org

Tags:

Natalie has been an LGBT journalist for 12 years and joined the Fyne team in 2001. Her interests outside of work are cycling, running and badminton. She is also studying for a degree in psychology.

Comments are closed.

OUTing the Past 2021 Events Timetable

Click here for the 2021 events Timetable

Authorised Firearms Officer (AFO)

Our campaign for New Recruits to serve as Police Constable (PC) Authorised Firearms Officers at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) […]

Victim Support

At Victim Support, we’ve been providing more services to victims of crime through digital platforms and are keen to understand […]

A Community Challenged

LGBT+ History Month 2021 In 2020 and 2021, we’ve had the utmost sympathy for the young LGBTQIA+ people, locked down […]

LGBT+ History Month 2021

Sue Sanders: Chair – Schools OUT UK, Professor Emeritus – The Harvey Milk Institute, Cofounder of LGBT+ History Month UK […]

Fyne Meets Juno Dawson

By Jack Latham Juno Dawson’s books include the global bestsellers, This Book Is Gay and Clean. She is presently adapting […]

Bourgeois & Maurice present

Insane Animals Original Cast Recording Available on all music streaming platforms from Monday 1 March, 2021. ‘Ambitious and stuffed with […]

Home Sweet Body

Ahead of their appearance The Coast is Queer, Brighton & Hove’s festival of LGBTQ+ literature, public speaker and mindfulness teacher, […]

COVID, Creativity, and Croquembouche Cones

Credit: Tanaka Mhishi Tanaka Mhishi is a poet, playwright and performer who makes issue-based work. With a record of creating […]

The Coast is Queer

Brighton & Hove’s LGBTQ+ literature festival goes online, 5-7 February 2021 The Coast is Queer, Brighton & Hove’s festival of […]

NEW QUEER PHOTOGRAPHY

EDITIED BY BENJAMIN WOLBERGS photo by Matt Lambert  “Art, more than anything, opens up the possibility of approaching one’s own sexuality beyond […]